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Visitor Testimonials
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“Simply Fascinating!
 In the 1880's Mount Tarawera erupted, obliterating much of the surrounding countryside.  Waimangu Volcanic Valley offers you the ability to walk down a track through the valley to see how it has evolved since that destruction.  It is a mass of geothermal activity and gives you a great understanding of how geothermal activity works.  Everything is discretely but well sign posted with plenty of explanatory notice boards. The walking requires a reasonable level of fitness but there is the option to stop and return from bus stops 1, 2 or 3.  At bus stop 3 there is the option of going out on a small boat to go around a headland to see even more geothermal activity. The bus trip back is a godsend, because it is only as the bus struggles back up the hills to the Visitor Centre that you realise how much walking downhill you have done.  On a hot day you definitely need to take water.  As an attraction this is far less busy than many but do not be deceived; the science on show here is fascinating.  You should go!" Visitor from the UK, January 2017


“Best in Rotorua district.   People come to Rotorua district to experience volcanic activities and there are three main attractions: Te Puia, Waimangu, and Waiotapu. Waimangu gets our vote despite its being without the mudpool and geyser features. What it has is 3 steamy lakes each with its own character and a most beautiful steamy gully and mud flats, set among natural forest. One experiences these features by walking through the forest - a downhill walk with an ascent to the third lake which has the look and feel of a swimming pool with the same blue and believe-it-or-not "concreted" sidewall! Then it is a walk through the gully which features a variety of activities including some small geysers. Then the mud flats. A bus will take you back to the entrance! We loved it."  Visitor from SE Asia, August 2016


"A very unique place for the nature connoisseur!  Very interesting geology and biology. So much to see and learn. Boat trip at the end is worthwhile and makes the experience complete. Need to do a lot of walking (including going down steep slope) but paths are clearly marked (possible just to take the shuttle bus, but you would miss the most interesting and beautiful things). Good map provided with detailed biological/geological information to do a self-guided tour. Spent half a day there, just enough to see everything without being rushed, but could have stayed longer. Seems to be off the beaten track for the large tour buses. This place is for the nature connoisseur, and not for the been-there-and took a photo crowd!" ​Visitor from China, July 2016


“Great views.  The park is filled with steaming geothermal activity. It also used to house the largest geyser in the world but that geyser ceased "blowing its stack" sometime in the early 20th century. Very interesting park; lots of photo opportunities."  Visitor from USA, May 2016


“Active geothermal crater/lake. Breathtaking view and easy hike down to see a "boiling" lake. Our guide was very knowledgeable about the area and explained the history as we hiked down. He also pointed out the native plants along the way. It was amazing to see the geothermal activity in and around the lake. We only had 2 hours here but could have spent the day exploring the area." Visitors from USA, April 2016
“A great way to see the volcanic activity. This park involved, for us, a long steep walk into the valley, then a 90 minute casual walk to the lake, where we took the free bus back to the start. Along the way you are constantly amazed by coloured pools, bubbling mud, great views, and surrounding nature. You can take as long as you want to walk the trails. This was our favourite thermal attraction in NZ, which cost $75 for two, and well worth it."  Visitor from Australia, March 2016

 

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